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>> eric: we'll be keeping tabs on egypt. >> shannon bream is next, live in washington. >> reporter: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who supp
and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern dance to contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to conference, playing a game of musical chairs where the end goal is more money from lucrative tv contracts. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connect
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
at the presidential palace in egypt who assured me there was no announcement yet to be made from the presidential palace regarding a truce agreement. he gave me a simple explanation. the president's sister passed away in egypt, still at the funeral and with family. he was not expected to be back in cairo to make an announcem t announcement. it was something that would probably come out of the egyptian intelligence service which has been negotiating intensity. egypt's president mohamed morsi is from the muslim brother hood. it's unlike he he has been involved in negotiations with the israeli side. the only people that could negotiate between the israelis and meet with hamas and other palestinian factions are probably the intelligence agencies there. that's where we understand the negotiations to still be ongoing. there's an outlined agreement, but nobody has signed the paper. that's why i think people here are still very apprehensive this could be the final hurdle. you're talking about the presence or the arrival of u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. there is no doubt the u.s. can play a ve
room" starts now. >>> happening now, police fire tear gas as demonstrations in egypt turn violent. angry protesters accuse egypt's president of betraying the revolution. and in the word of one critic, making himself a pharoah. what happened before and after u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s. did in the moments before killing osama bin laden. >>> wolf blitzer's off today. i'm joe johns. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's astonishing show of fury in egypt. within the past hour egyptian authorities tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look
center stage in protests in egypt. the president seizes more power, undermining the country's democratic reform. the turmoil follows a still fragile cease-fire in gaza as the middle east takes another volatile turn. >>> at home, white house critics press for more answers about what went wrong in libya, and whether officials were truthful with the public. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary. >>> my guests this morning weigh in. chairman of the armed services committee carl levin. and chairman of the house homeland security committee, new york republican peter king. then where does america stand on the verge of a second obama term in office? the economy, the fiscal cliff talks, the president's priorities in the next four years. our roundtable is here. david brooks of "the new york times." msnbc's reverend al sharpton. former ceo of hewlett-packard carly fiorina >> historian and film maker ken burns. and nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. and we'l
. more clashes in egypt over the weekend as police use tear gas this morning to disburse protesters in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david brooks and our own andrea mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term
's always a pleasure. thank you very much. >> thank you. >>> and up next, protests in egypt and the turnover on the president's foreign policy team. we'll talk to dennis ross. >>> and still ahead, former bush national security adviser steven hadley, plus our correspondents in the field. this is "andrea mitchell reports" only on msnbc. sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking tamiflu and call your doctor immediately. children and a
a plea to allies of the palestinians in particular. the president of egypt, the prime minister of turkey said if you would like to see a two-state solution in the near future, a palestinian state next to israel this has to deescalate now. the president expressing this fear if hamas doesn't stop rocket attacks on to israel's soille he fears left unsaid is israel may retaliate and turn in to a ground war and then the idea of a two-state solution in the peace process will be in the way distant future. obviously the middle east peace process has been on hold for quite sometime. he was asked about this trip will include a visit to myanmar which is also known as burma. he was asked whether it was too soon. a lot of human rights violations taken in burma and he wouldn't have gone if aung san suu kyi didn't think it was right for him to go. a few notes to point out. one is during -- before the press conference he and secretary clinton were visiting a mondastermonastery. they were joking about getting prayers over the fiscal cliff. the president at the press conference was asked what about what k
strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the obama administration did an excellent job of supporting israel all through this. made israel feel moderate and the arabs feel realistic. the second piece of good news is that egypt, even under the muslim brotherhood, has an interest in having stability. that's very important. the bad news is the islamists are in control. in the palestinian areas with hamas and certainly in control in egypt. and there's going to be no peace as long as they are there in control, and u.s. policy has got to be a long, gradual process of trying to build up the non-islamists in the arab world, including in iran, across the region. >> that frames it. we'll hear more from you in the roundtable. >>> now let me turn to carl levin, chairman of course of the armed services committee in the senate. senator, to egypt. how concerned are you? is morsi a partner of the united states, or a p
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
. things are moving fast in egypt right now. we're going there to take you on the ride. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually like something. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> he was the man of the hour, egypt's first democratically elected president. now morsi is being called aa would-be dictator and people are protesting. some are getting killed. massive crowds today at funeral of a protestor who died overnight fatally injured during demonstrations last week against morsi putting his decisions beyond judicial review. ever since he issued it the streets looked like this when millions rose to overthrow "the dictator" hosni mubarak. this it time they accuse him of a naked power grab. today he met with members of the highest judicial body and emerged saying it his edict was clarified. it remaining unclear. we have the late heest from cairo. this clari
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
and it's the ultimate nn trying to declare the judiciary in egypt basically null and void. >> yeah, look, morsi came out last week looking rather good, like a statesman and he helped organization the cease-fire and reined hamas in and took responsibility and moved immediately from that to give himself dictatorial powers. if those dictatorial powers are taken by him the arab spring is pretty much over and democratization is pretty much over. i'men couraged to see how many people come into the streets and they don't want to trade mubarak to the theocracy that morsi and the brotherhood are proposing. i'm not sure at that morsi is going to give up that easily. >> alisyn: thank you for your insight. good to see you. up next it's a state in debt. why is illinois spending for cable for prisoners and on pig races. and a man gets through security with a woman's boarding pass? how was that done and is anything being done about it. ♪ ♪ ♪ hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the be
gay people straight. she'll join me next. >>> plus, as egypt's president comes under fire, president morsi speaks out about president obama. speaking live with someone that just interviewed morsi, don't miss this. shopping for medicare coverage? don't wait. open enrollment ends december 7th. now's the time to take action. call unitedhealthcare today. >>> now to egypt. several new developments today. first off, dmon straights prompted the u.s. to shut down the embassy there. the embassy was not under fire but clashes between protesters and riot police clogged streets around the complex. this chaos is going on for days as demonstrators threatened the new islamic president morsi with a second revolution. >>> and then there's this. lawmakers dominated by islamists are now rushing to draft a new constitution. this move is seen by some of morsi's critics as an effort by the muslim brotherhood to hijack the constitution. and amid all of this, president morsi is on the cover of "time" magazine. "time" calls him the most important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credi
that they will continue to play that role. the bigger problem is that this occupation is not egypt's fault. it is israel's fault. and it's unreasonable to expect egypt or turkey or any other country to put pressure on palestinians. what should be done instead is quite the opposite. the united states is the largest funder of israel. the united states gives $3 billion a year in u.s. taxpayer money to israel in addition to weapons, in addition to political support. if we're going to be serious about moving forward, the role has to come from the united states, pressure from the united states. it's not enough to demand that it come from egypt. >> diana buttu, many thanks for your time. we appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >>> back in the u.s., get ou of the way because black friday is here. people spend long hours in line to score major deals this morning. >> it's affordable right now even if you have to be out here for two days to get it. >> it saves a lot of money like a few hundred dollars. >> cnbc's courtney reagan is in dayton, ohio. how is it going so far out there? >> reporter: you know, so far it looks
looked at the meeting being anywhere near sufficient in clarifying. let's go to egypt where there are genuine foreign policy issues and contentions needing to be resolved. is he trying to rush this through too quickly? what do we know about what the document itself will look like, and whether or not it will be one that captures the democratic principles that we hope that egypt moves forward with. >> there are loads of questions and you put your finger on many of them. let's be hopeful to suggest that this may be a marchbury versus madison moment in egypt. you have constitutions playing their role. president morsi has been fighting hard to make sure there is an effective executive. you have a judiciary who wants to display its independence. unfortunately you don't have a parliament dissolved by egypt's equivalent of the supreme court. i think there are very serious questions about this constitutional assembly, not so much formation but 25% of it reflects the religious minorities and women have walked out because they don't think their issues are being adequately addressed. i
. >> let me ask you, what's your reaction to egypt's prime minister's role in this very difficult stand-off knowing that the muslim brotherhood dominates the egyptian government right now? >> i think the egyptian must decide, must take a stand. in one hand, they come to you, to the u.s. and to europe and ask for a lot of money. on the other hand, they endorse the hamas. only yesterday prime minister of egypt came to gaza. he did not condemn the attacks on the israeli civilian population. they think egypt must take a hold here and to tell the hamas, if you want the backing of egypt, stop fighting. stop shooting missiles into israel much it is very clear. we do not know what the hamas wants. we have no sentiment in gaza today. no occupation, no blame game. why they are doing it? it is pure hatred against jews who live in israel and we are expect egypt to take a different role. >> i've been following prime minister netanyahu's messages on twitter over the past 24 hours. and he's been writing that the terrorists are committing what he calls double war crimes. they fire at three civilians an
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
of trying to achieve a long-term or durable solution to this problem. of course, he also spoke with egypt's president morsi, reiterated similar ideas, emphasized the importance of a long-term, more durable solution. he thanked morsi for the role he played in brokering this cease-fire. i'm told by senior administration officials that the president's relationship with mohamed morsi really got stronger throughout this process. so, they're encouraged by that. they are also saying secretary clinton really played a key role in these negotiations, so they are cautiously optimistic. >> two thoughts on that. i mean, obviously, secretary clinton's role, it was, you know, a high-risk decision to send her there. she's managed to come away with a deal. obviously, she and the president deserve a tremendous amount of credit. also this idea of strengthening the relationship with morsi because what i've heard from administration officials is they're concerned they haven't had the leverage with morsi they may have had with the previous head of egypt. are you picking that up as well? >> reporter: absolutely
is thrown together in egypt. we know they are an important relationship with us. what do we do? what does the united states do? >> we have to recognize our limitations. we can only play on the margins. money changes everything. morsy is achilles' heel, that is really the economy. tourism is gone. it is very important to them. foreign investment has essentially dried up. we do spend well over a billion dollars in aid, primarily to the military every year. it filters through the economy. we should stop -- connell: we should stop doing that? >> if morsy pushes through the constitution, there is no reason to continue sending over billions of dollars a year. it also looks like under this constitution that morsy bought off the army. they get the money. they spend it anyway they want. this constitution, as i understand it, there will be no interference by the army with the government. he has a good chance of becoming this software powered dictator. connell: thank you, sir. i appreciate you coming on. corporations paying out these early dividends. they are trying to be the coming tax hikes. our q
of peace looking at the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia and libya. the arab spring are in the state of transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each. this took place earlier this week in washington. it's two hours. >> good morning everyone. i'm steve heydemann for issues of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on the securities sector reform in the arab world and some rsvp to me have been scared by the false rumor that it would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that is not the case. so you do not need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you here with us all this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important but also especially urgent. i do not think that it is an exaggeration to say what happens with the security sectors in the arab world and by security sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus that
with us. who was the strongest player in that whole period? it was egypt. egypt was strong because egypt has peace with israel. the way to be strong is not by making war and unilateral declarations in the u.n. that have no meaning. the way to gain strength is to be a partner. >> is the cease-fire holding? >> cease-fire's holding so far. >> and you thank egypt's president mohamed morsi for that? >> he is so far now proving to be a constructive partner certainly as proven in this last operation. >> is he honoring the peace treaty with israel? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wa
is testing is real. israel is testing egypt. there is more uncertainty about israel and the end of -- the relationship with iran. what is hezbollah doing now that they are involved in their own fights inside syria? the opportunity for turkey to play a role right now. it just is the normans. this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i am reminded of bob dylan's favorite song. i propose we adopted as the anthem. there must be some way out of here. let's aim of for some relief, and maybe a little less confusion. i would like to propose the following format for the beginning of the panel. then i want to open it up for a lot of questions on the floor. i would like to propose our panelists talked about the situation right now, especially in syria. but what if scenarios, and their recommendation and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today have their year on the ground. y are constituencies there ar people whose opinions are sought. i would like to introduce a membe
after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. ham
and israel, that eight-day bombardment of rockets going back and forth and egypt having to step in to broker a peace deal, do you think that if the u.n. recognizes statehood that palestine and palestinians and israeli negotiations would be better suited to coming up to a longer standing two-state solution? >> to get a state that will have only through negotiations. they know it. we know it. united states knows it. all the europeans know it. after the operations in gaza they feel maybe -- they have to encourage him and do everything to -- maybe help him. they had like to help him by the recognition today. it's a meaningless resolution. to get a state should be only through negotiations. all of us knows it. we are trying to negotiate with them since we took power. not only us. the former prime minister offered them almost everything. 98.5% of the territory. they didn't say yes. when barak was prime minister of israel, he offered the same to arafat and arafat said yes -- said no. so now since we took power, they put any obstacle they could in order to resume the negotiations. first they ask pri
. >> check your local mcdonald's. for more than a week protests have ravaged egypt over the new nation dictator. grant himself almost complete power of almost 80 million people. the most populist in the region. today he spoke as lawmakers there began drafting a new constitution. we will hear from him. next, what egypt's president had to say about his controversial power grab and what could mean for the united states and the world as fox reports live tonight. stop! stop! stop! come back here! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?! we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, and we do everything we can to be there for them when they need us. [car alarm blaring] call now and also ask about our 24/7 support and service. call... and lock in your rate for 12 months today. liberty mut
, michael steele and jonathan capehart onset as well. rick stengel went to interview the president of egypt. obviously he's the man at the center of all the action in the middle east right now. we're all trying to figure out who he is. i learned something by reading "time" magazine. i found out he's a usc grad and still a trojans fan. little known fact. >> always start with the important parts of life. >> i'm sure he's very upset with what happened with the notre dame game. more importantly, who is this man who seems to be an accidental president who suddenly feels very comfortable with seizing power in the most important arab state in the planet? >> it's really interesting. this interview done by rick stengel and my colleagues is amazing because it sheds some light on this man who is really an ig enigma. he's walking var fine line between hard core islamists and others in the middle east. one of the most interesting things in the interview is how he feels about the u.s. that's been a big question mark for everyone here. what is this man's relationship to the u.s. what is our relationship w
to egypt's president morsi. this is the first major flare up of israel-policemen since morsi gained control of egypt. >>> coming up on the morning news, trouble for an accused masked shooter. why a court hearing was delayed for james holmes the suspected gunman in the colorado movie theater shooting and later luck running you want for two brothers trying to pull off a multimillion dollar lottery scheme. this is the "cbs morning news." mother: this is george. he is a good little monkey and always very curious. one day george got an important letter... he's built a rocket ship to travel into space. girl: google, how far is earth to the moon? google voice response: moon is 238,900 miles... mother vo: the great moment had come... ...3...2...1. ♪ have led to an increase intands clinical depression. drug and alcohol abuse is up. and those dealing with grief don't have access to the professional help they need. when you see these issues, do you want to walk away or step up? with a degree in the field of counseling or psychology from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to make a differe
article, "new york times," egypt tumult, a rift emerges in morsi's team. morsi, who is part of the muslim brotherhood, they say hey, you know what? we're not going to be involved in the process. we're just going to sit back here. we're going to read our koran. and we're just going to sit back. suddenly they decide we're going to be involved in the process, which is all right. and then we see this weekend, morsi is seizing power that he doesn't have. egypt's about to get really ugly again. >> you know, i think that you see the pushback in the streets. morsi's not going to be able to get away with everything that he wants to get away with. they've turned a corner. >> what's his justification for seizing all of this power illegally? >> hubris. the guy -- he had just helped broker a deal in gaza, and he felt that he had some running room with the americans because he, you know, had essentially done our bidding. >> he's got the president of the united states calling him, the american secretary of state. >> that kind of goes to your head. >> yeah. i'm a big guy. >> you know, you live half your
in preparation for war. >> ben joins us by phone this morning. egypt's prime minister paid a visit to gaza. somehow that going so far? >> well, it was originally planned it would be a three-hour cease fire while the egyptian prime minister was making this visit to gaza. according to our sources, it doesn't appear either side significantly reduced their level of military activity in gaza. certainly before the sun came up there was an intense air attack on gaza itself. it may have been lessened somewhat in the morning while the prime minister was touring gaza. but after he's gone, it's expected to get back to the same pace. >> there are elections coming up not too long from now in israel. palestinians are saying that may be part of the impetus for israel to be taking action. >> certainly this is what you hear oftentimes. tc it was the casame case in the 2008, 2009 offensive. they say the leaders are motivated by a desire to show they're strong on hamas. in fact, we spoke to one palestinian lawmaker who stressed the point that really this is all about politics. >> and ben, of course, one of t
from iran that it basically needs to provoke the muslim brotherhood in egypt to be more supportive of it. perhaps it's iran wanting to deflect attention from syria. perhaps it's an effort by hamas to in effect bridle its credentials to prove to the palestinians on the west bank that its route is the best way to deal with israel. >> while britain and germany have both said hamas bears the brunt of the blame, mohamed morsi appears to lay some blame on the israelis. is he torn with his fellow islamists and the need to maintain the treaty obligations with israel? >> martin, if he isn't yet, he could be soon, and that's, of course, the real danger here. if this thing goes on just for a short time, then maybe we wind up okay. but if it goes on for days or weeks, like the 2008-2009 war that ambassador ginsberg referred to, then i think all bets are off as to just how long the egyptian regime can really sustain this stance of sort of being between the two. you know, in a broader sense, of course, the cease-fire that hamas had respected for a number of years never reflected a fundamental st
that country. in egypt a scene of devastation at a railroad crossing after a train hit a bus caring kindergarten students. the government says 49 children are dead, 18 others hurt. >>> back in this country, the coast guard is still searching for two oil rig workers after yesterday's explosion and fire on a platform in the gulf of mexico. >>> a 20-year-old missouri man is facing charges for an admitted plot to want a shooting spree at a theater showing the new twilight movie. the man's mother contacted police after she discovered he bought weapons like the ones used in the colorado movie theater massacre. >>> nfl great mike ditka say his doctors say he suffered a very minor stroke. ditka was playing cards yesterday when he suddenly had trouble speaking and using his hands. espn analyst says he feels good right now and it's not a big deal. and those are your fast five headlines. >>> we have this breaking news. israel and gaza exchange rocket fire for the fourth straight day. new video from the ground in gaza shows the damage from the israeli warplanes and other missiles. the warplanes
up to 37 or 38 so maybe there is wiggle room. >>shepard: thank you, ed. egypt's president is trying to quiet the country after he took almost absolute power and has spoken to his people. we thought it would be a live speech of president morsi by he put it on video and they will play it to the people shortly. when they see it, we will see it. it is very important. the reaction on the streets of cairo less than two years after people kicked their president out. and a health care for former president george h.w. bush, he has been in the hospital for a week now. are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. >>shepard: 17 minutes past the hour. egyptian president morsi has recorded a statement on the uprising in the crucial area of the middle east and egyptian lawmakers are returning to complete a brand new constitution that could end president morsi's power grab. last week he essentially maim himself a dictator. he issue
collins said she would need additional information before she could support her nomination. >>> egypt rushing a vote on a final draft of a constitution as protests continue against the president, mohammed morsy. he has faced bitter criticism. >>> the state of texas has filed papers to seize a large ranch owned by the flds, a fundamentalist radical mormon sex that believes in polygamy. its leader, warren jeffs, is serving a life sentence. >>> you never know what you might see on the streets of new york city this is a first. casper the pony and razzie the zebra roaming free on staten island. they got free from the home where they lived. they were returned home safe and sound. >> can you imagine mommy, mommy, look. >> they are getting along just fine. >> moment of kindness captured with a camera. coming up, a young police officer's deed goes viral for all the right reasons.od ays. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ide
with the soldiers in it. palestinians and especially hamas in gaza seem to believe that when egypt was taken over by the muslim brotherhood, the muslim brotherhood who if you like are hamas' dig brother, they felt themselves safer under the protection of the muslim brotherhood in exwiptd, they felt safer. so they felt they were able to provoke to push israel and israel at the a serb point said enough is enough. yeah, you'd expect that you would think they would expect to get attacked. >> one more quick question. egypt recalling its ambassador, how serious a response is that? >> i think it's to be expected. israel sent its ambassador home from egypt saying it was planned of course. who knows. i think it's a serious moment and at play of course is the peace agreement between israel and egypt. another reason hamas felt safer because they felt israel would do anything at all to not provoke egypt into abandoning peace. so very serious. >> martin fletcher, thank you for your great report. you're the best in the business. >> a fascinating report. thank you, martin. >>> back to some business here in the
constitution here? >> reporter: another important day today. the constitutional assembly in egypt at h hour is drafting egypt's all important new constitution. this is going to be the corner stone of egypt's democratic transition and one of the reasons why president morsy and the muslim brotherhood have been locking horns with opposition factions. this was a hundred member panel assigned to draft this constitution. there's been conflict. it is dominated by iz mists. liberal memberquit. some sued to disband the panel and start again. you will recall one of mr. morsy's ke crees said no one will disband this constitutional assembly. not even the judiciary. they believe it needs to be drafted to get it going. that's why opposition is upset. look for more conflict later today. >> thank you. >>> the other big news, in washington the white house tryinging to kick start fiscal cliff talks. just 33 days. congress breaks for the holidays in 15 days. >> treasury secretary tim geithner is going to try to get the talks moving today. he'll meet with congressional leaders on capitol hill. let's go to dan
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